Opening More Doors: Neighborhood House offers safe place to learn, grow

BY MAX BACKLUND

Children and adults at Neighborhood House’s intergenerational celebration of 2018 Veterans Day with music, history and the presentation of the American flag.

For 124 years, Neighborhood House has been serving hundreds of Utahns from age 15-months to 100 years old. Their education day care programs allow children a safe place to learn and grow, while their adult support services provide supervised care during the day to aging and disabled adults, allowing their families to have the support they need to work and be caregivers.

For our adult populations, Neighborhood House offers a service you can take advantage of that is going to support your family’s success in keeping your loved ones at home with you,”

— Jennifer Nuttall, Executive Director of Neighborhood House.
  • Nuttall has been with Neighborhood House as an employee for eight years, but she first came to know them in 2007 as a client. Nuttall was a newly single parent to two young children and in need of help when her neighbor suggested Neighborhood House.

    “I was looking around, thinking ‘what am I going to do with my kids while I am at work?’ I just was so relieved to find a place that cared about my situation,” Nuttall said.

    Not only does Neighborhood House provide a broad range of programs and services, but all of these are offered on a sliding scale to meet families where they are at. For hard-working families trying to make ends meet, these affordable services are in high demand.

    With a waitlist for their children’s services and an ever-growing elderly population, Neighborhood House has decided to expand to meet community needs. Over the next two years, they are building brand new facilities on their existing campus in the

  • 84104 zip code — Salt Lake’s most economically depressed zip code.

    The new facility will not only allow more families to be served but will also allow for more integration between the programs offered, like the intergenerational events between their elderly clients and the kids in the youth programs. Just this past Veterans Day, clients who are veterans were invited to showcase their medals and memorabilia, and Neighborhood House kids presented them with flags and songs, thanking them for their service.

    “Children and adults get to interact, and it ends up being really beneficial for both groups,” Nuttall said.

    The new space will add new staff opportunities for Neighborhood House as they prepare to serve another 100 Utah families. Their commitment to providing quality programming for Utahns both young and old is what makes Neighborhood House a true Utah Community Builder.

Max Backlund is the Director of the Utah Community Builders Foundation.

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